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for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. the united states will begin evacuating americans out of japan amid growing concern over the nuclear plant crisis. here's the latest. japanese military helicopters have begun dumping water on the crippled power plant to try to cool overheated nuclear fuel. engineers are trying to install a new power line so they can restore power to the plant's cooling system. a top u.s. nuclear official says he believes radiation levels at the plant are extremely high, and will soon be deadly. the obama administration has urged the evacuation of all americans from a 50-mile radius of the fukushima daiichi plant. now, charter planes will be brought in to help those wanting to leave the country. charlie d'agata is in yoshida, japan, with more on this. good morning, charlie. tell us the latest where you are. >> good morning to you, betty. well, you may be wondering where i am. we've been trying to make our way to the quake zone. the japanese military has taken over all the highways. obviously we're trying to steer clear of the nuclear power plant. we had to cut through the moun
where you left off. more than ever, when we talk about the nightmare in japan, we're really talking about two nightmares. the nuclear one and everything else. again today, fire broke out at that devastated fukushima daiichi plant. and another blast of radiation escaped, for reasons still not entirely clear. the few remaining workers had to leave but they came right back in even greater numbers when the danger eased. this crisis stems from overheated fuel rods but elsewhere in japan, a cold snap, including snow, adding to the misery. searching, supporting, surviving, all of it is made more grueling because of the weather. officially the death toll topped 4,000, with more than 8,000 considered missing. this woman is scouring the rubble for her uncle. she thought she may have found his shoe. the nation heard from the emperor, reserveder pot direst of national emergencies. the emperor act key per act hes heart is broken. the volunteer utility workers who have been exposed to life-threatening radiation levels ots fukushima daiichi. their company hasn't released personal information abou
. many people who live and work in tokyo come from other parts of japan, and now they want to go home. there is definitely more than just a trickle now of families leaving tokyo for other parts of japan because of the fear of radiation. most of the more than 30 million people who live in and around the city, though, leaving is not an option. they have no place to go and if there is a major release of radiation from the fukushima plant, there dawes -- doesn't seem to be a plan what to do either. if there is, the asumi family hasn't been told about it. they are watching the events to the north with growing consternation. they have an 8-month-old baby and they simple isly don't trust what the government is telling them about the lack of danger. >> i don't think so. you don't trust them in? i don't trust them. >> why not? >> because companies say not -- not truth. >> and what is this you have bought? is is this new if >> yeah, new. >> so instead the asumis like millions of other tokyoites are making their own plans. helmets, facemasks and a car standing by to head south at a moment's noti
the will and the determination to come back after something like this, it is japan. and we'd like to encourage you to help them. they need it. we've made it really easy for you. just go to our web page cnn.com/impact. >>> and now it's time for me to pass it over to brooke baldwin. brooke, you can't help but want to help these people when you look at these images? >> absolutely. cnn.com/impact. thank you, randi. >>> i want to begin this newscast today with an image i cannot shake. an entire village wiped out in 90 seconds. 90 seconds for the ocean to swell and overtake this one town while those who live there, those who had moved quickly enough, watched from higher ground. watch this with me. >> doesn't that just take your breath away? imagine you're one of the fortunate perched atop this hill watching your home, your town, people scrambling in the bottom left watching it all being wiped away. that was friday in miyagi prefecture. the twin forces in that tsunami were just the beginning. look at this. we have the satellite photo from digital globe and it shows the damage to the reactors at the fukushima daiichi
that there hasn't been a broader call for help from japan may have something to do with it. relief efforts right now are focused on immediate needs like food, water and medical care. all goods and services that can be purchased locally. internationally charities like the red cross, world vision and save the children are on the ground doi ining exactly that already. that's why cash donations now directed at those charities may be the best thing americans can do to help the victims when their need is the most. for more information, go to cnn.com/impact. >>> that's it for me. brooke baldwin takes over now with "newsroom". >>> my promise to you, we won't get too far from japan chblt we'll get to the new images and information there in just a moment. >>> first, i want you to listen to what secretary of state hillary clinton has now just told cnn's wolf blitzer. >> we don't want any ambiguity. only the security council can authorize action, and if they do authorize action, there needs to be a true international response, including arab leadership and partnership. >> wolf is traveling right along with
kneejerk reactions that didn't seem to take into account the new nuances of the crisis japan is experiencing. the fact is that the idea of more nuclear energy was just starting to gain ground in the united states, given the interest in clean, abundant and cheap energy. that nuclear renaissance in america is now in danger. right now one-fifth of america's electricity comes from 104 nuclear reactors. they're expensive. companies were loathed to build them, given the tangle of regulations so the federal government offered loan guarantees to get operators to invest their money. president obama is asking for $36 billion for nuclear power in this year's proposed budget. 12 applications right now for construction and licenses. but real safety issues during unforeseen catastrophic events like what happened in japan will have to be addressed by the industry. we still need alternatives to oil and coal, but we'll have to see whether more nuclear generated electricity is part of our future. that's it for me now. brooke baldwin takes over with "newsroom". >>> we are going to take you to l
japan'is's eye view of damaged nuclear plant. the effort to cool it goes on. people living near this facility flee for safety. japan fears as many as 15,000 may have died. welcome to "bbc world news." forces come to's benghazi. he delivers a radio message. >> we are coming on this happy day. tomorrow, benghazi will change and there will again be a fun, dance, and cries of joy. >> has japanese nuclear engineers battle to prevent a disaster, there is no let up. half a million people made homeless by friday's earthquake and tsunami. more supplies are reaching survivors. many still lack basic necessities. dozens of the evacuation centers have been set up. thousands were forced to flee from the nuclear exclusion zone. >> they come seeking refuge. fleeing tradition of's nuclear plant -- fukushima's nuclear plant and carrying what is most precious to them. there is a chance for radiation. more than 1000 have arrived here already. there are reunions. exhaustion and relief. this family was just 5 miles from the damaged reactor. as they made it here, the fuel in their car was running out.
-ft. worth airports, radiation levels, thankfully low, have been picked up on passengers returning from japan. but the battle and the focus remain on the fukushima station and its crippled reactors. reactor number three, the scene of aerial water bombardment today, brave crew members dropped sea water in a desperate attempt to cool what is being describes as the single greatest threat. the fukushima six reactors, reactor three is the only one housing a mixed fuel known as mox, short for mixed oxide, a material made of reclaimed plutonium, the release of which would pose far more devastating effects than weave seen thus far. reactor four and its lack of water set off the biggest rift between nuclear authorities in the united states and japan. the u.s. believes the situation there is far worse than the japanese counterparts concede. the rift has led to a mini exodus of americans and others within japan. let's go now to nbc's chief environmental affairs correspondent, anne thompson. authorities in japan have just announced they may be close to restoring power to a stricken reactor, that's reacto
of the food coming here from japan. we'll have answers for you here tonight. >>> the struggle of those rebels in libya to now get the upper hand as nbc's richard engel lives through a close call on the ground. >>> making a difference. with a combination of medical expertise and a higher power. >>> and a screen gem is gone. some say the last of the true movie stars. tonight we'll remember elizabeth taylor. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. we're still in the middle of an air assault on libya. really the third front the u.s. is fighting on these days. it was launched by president obama to protect civilians, he said, because gadhafi's forces were bearing down on the rebels' headquarter city of benghazi. but all those cruise missiles and bombs still haven't stopped the ground fighting. the rebels were under heavy fire today about 100 miles to the south of benghazi. and as you're about to see, our own chief foreign correspondent, richard engel, was with them and got about as close as you'd ever want to. richard is back safely in benghazi ton
, alarm. the nuclear warning level in japan is raised as these brave men march head long into the worst nuclear disaster of the century. the faces of the heroes of fukushima, unknown, unnamed, facing certain exposure to radiation levels on the rise. their story, just ahead. >>> and this hour, a new crisis developing on the sands of north africa. the united states and its allies, great britain and france, along with other arab nations have now made it clear to libya's dictator, colonel gadhafi that his offensive against rebel forces is over. air asefsets of great britain a france are being rushed to the region to enforce a new no-fly zone and five u.s. navy warships are steaming off libya's coast, set to take offensive action to enforce it. the president's speaking at the white house just a short time ago, said there would be no negotiation and that colonel gadhafi had to cease attacking his own people or pay the consequences. >> these terms are not subject to negotiation. if gadhafi does not comply with the resolution, the international community will impose consequences. and the resolu
'm harry smith. also tonight, one week after japan's earthquake and tsunami a big break for the engineers trying to prevent a nuclear meltdown. and kids from around america and haiti, too, do what they can to help the people of japan. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> smith: good evening, katie is on assignment. president obama delivered a warning today to libyan dictator moammar qaddafi: stop slaughtering your people or face military action. the united states will help enforce a no-fly zone approved last night by the u.n. security council, but no american ground troops will be sent to libya. french and british warplanes could be in the air over libya by tomorrow. hours after the u.n. resolution passed, the qaddafi regime declared a cease-fire, but his forces reportedly kept shelling two cities-- misurata and ajdabiya. and there are also reports that qaddafi's forces are headed toward benghazi, the rebels' capital. david martin at the pentagon begins our coverage. david, good evening. >> reporter:
>>> the race to cool down an overheating nuclear reactor, japan sends in helicopters to douse it with water. >>> with radiation levels dangerously high water cannons are brought in to try to prevent a meltdown. >> it is 6:00 p.m. in tokyo, 5:00 a.m. anita rajpal. >> and i'm in abob dab by. heading for the exit. foreign visitors, they're packing their bags. >> there are still some places devastated by the tsunami that no rescue teams have reached as the snow comes down. skwap's winter weather makes life even harder for the survivors. >>> moammar gadhafi's troops gain ground from the rebels as diplomats outside libya consider a no-fly zone. >>> but first japan's race to prevent a nuclear castastrophe. workers are using everything they've got to try to regain control of the most badly damaged reactor. they could be exposing themselves to radiation but officials say they can't afford to pull emergency staff out of the complex. the recovery effort at the fukushima plant interred a new phase. helicopters dropping 7.5 tons of seawater on the number 3 reactor to stop fuel rods from ov
in japan. a short time ago, the japanese government told the iaea that its engineers have been able to lay an external power cable at one of the reactors at the fukushima plant. now, this means they hope to reconnect power as soon as they are done spraying water on unit number three. earlier today, workers dumped thousands of gallons of water on the reactors by helicopter. the flights were stopped after the government realized they were not helping cool the unit down. they're still spraying water on reactors from the ground. the u.s. military is sending a nine-member team to japan, as early as today, to help evacuate -- to evaluate the nuclear situation. it's not clear if they will go to the plant that's been damaged. president obama is due to make a statement at 3:30 eastern time. joining me now is a physicist who has worked on nuclear reactor accident simulations. thank you for joining us. >> nice to be here. >> let's talk about this breaking news at this power cable may be down very soon and this could finally provide some power to unit number three. one of those -- unit number two, exc
. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, another setback in japan. workers again forced to evacuate as smoke pours from crippled nuclear reactors and concerns grow about the safety of japan's food supply. and another a.t.f. agent tells cbs news the agency encouraged gun dealers in this country to sell weapons to mexican drug cartels. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. for a third straight night, tripoli has come under attack from u.s. and allied forces as they establish a no-fly zone over libya. anti-aircraft fire lit up the sky as moammar qaddafi's army tried to defend against the attack. rebels solidified their control in benghazi and launch and offensive to retake other cities. president obama said today the u.s. will turn over leadership of the operation to other nations within days. the president and british prime minister david cameron said qaddafi must go though they insisted he is not a target of the attacks. but a cruise missile attack last night may h
in the area around japan's damaged fukushima nuclear plant today, forcing emergency workers to temporarily abandon the facility, as tens of thousands of homeless struggled with snows and bitter cold. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the "newshour" tonight, we get the latest on efforts to control the growing crisis in japan, including the stories of survivors and rescue crews in towns virtually wiped out by the tsunami. >> woodruff: we examine the health risks from the radiation spewing from the reactors and being carried by the wind far from japan's shores. >> ifill: plus, kwame holman looks at the u.s. nuclear energy industry in the context of japan's current crisis. >> woodruff: then, jeffrey browç updates the conflict in libya,ç as moammar qaddafi's forces move against key rebel strongholds. >> ifill: and science correspondent miles o'brien reports on nasa's next deep space ambitions, including a journey to the planet closest to the sun. >> we'll take you to mercury and beyond. you know, the solar system is not the same place you learned about in grad
in libya, across the middle east and japan. wolf in washington. two. happening right now, breaking news. president barack obama warns libyan troops and moammar gadhafi to stop attacks against civilians or face military action. how far will the u.s. and its allies go to enforce a u.n.-authorized no-fly zone? also this hour, a new level of crisis at japan's crippled snuk power plant. as the race goes on to heat down those reactors, officials now say this disaster is on par with the worst nuclear accident in u.s. history and mile after mile of destruction, search and rescue crews barely know where to begin. we're with emergency teams risking their own lives to save others. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> president obama says the world has given moammar gadhafi ample warning that his bloody assault on rebel forces will not stand. mr. obama putting gadhafi on notice just a while ago, a day after the u.n. security council approved the use of force to protect civilians in libya. the president says the libyan leader would commit atrocities if left unchecked and thousands o
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: workers at japan's damaged fukushima nuclear plant used water cannons, heavy duty fire hoses, and military helicopters in an effort to cool down overheating fuel rods, but it's not clear that anything has worked. president obama said today there was no risk to any u.s. territory from the reactors. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the containment operations, the ongoing exodus of people from areas close to the reactors, and new footage from when the tsunami struck six days ago. >> woodruff: and amid signs of both resilience and confusion, we look at japan's political culture in response to the disaster. >> brown: then, ray suarez has an update on libya, as the u.n. moves to a vote on establishing a no-fly zone over the country. >> woodruff: margaret warner talks to irish prime minister enda kenny about the celtic tiger's struggle to kick-start it's economy. >> brown: and tom bearden reports on a project to use private satellites to help stop g
on the disaster in japan. ten days after those nuclear reactors were damaged by the earthquake and tsunami, a new setback today in the recovery operation. workers were forced again to evacuate when smoke was spotted coming from two of the reactors. the official death toll from the disaster now totals 8,800, nearly 13,000 are still missing. now there are concerns about radiation in japanese pots and in sea water near the plant. bill whitaker has the latest including details about the plant's spotty safety record. >> reporter: it's a sign this crisis is far from under control. ten days after the fukushima plant was knocked out by japan's massive earthquake and tsunami and once again reactor three is spewing smoke a few hours later white smoke from reactor two. it's a mysterious and serious setback, one that prompted workers to evacuate and once again stopped efforts to stabilize the plant. over the weekend, there had been some encouraging signs. plant operators had reconnected electric cables to all six reactors for the first time since the crisis began. and after days of firefighters dousing react
personnel threatened by radiation in japan as the first american victim of the tragedy is found. >>> and medical marvel. a texas man gets the first full facial transplant in the u.s. this is the "cbs morning news" facial transplant in the u.s. this is the "cbs morning news" for tuesday, march 22nd, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning and thanks for joining us. i'm betty nguyen. this morning allied forces are working to expand the no fly zone over libya. overnight tripoli was targeted for the third day in a row and there is growing discord among the allies and here in this country over the u.s. role. susan mcginnis is in washington with more. >> reporter: several days of attacks on libya are having their intended effect according to u.s. officials, even so, more in congress are questioning the president's decisions. anti-aircraft fire erupted in tripoli overnight as moammar gadhafi's forces battled a fresh round of air strikes. u.s. officials say days of attacks on the regime's ground troops are working and coalition forces are ready to expand the u.n.'s no fly zone t
." >> a new aftershock shakes japan as two workers at the fukushima nuclear plant are treated for high levels of radiation. the battle for libya goes on. france says it could take weeks, not months, to destroy gaddafi's military capabilities. parliament rejects austerity measures in portugal and the prime minister resigns. welcome to "bbc world news." i am david eades. also coming up in the program, the suicide bombing ritual acted out by children and posted as an online video. >> two workers at japan's fukushima nuclear power station have been taken to the hospital after they were exposed to high levels of radiation. the leak of radiation has already contaminated tokyo's water supply. authorities say that tap water is once again safe. in the last couple of hours, there's been a further strong aftershock. at a news conference just a short while ago, the japanese chief cabinet secretary was talking about what had happened to those two nuclear workers. >> yesterday at reactor building number three, workers were laying cables. the radiation levels have been monitored constantly. they stepped int
in the united states, a direct result of the disaster in japan. how much will the devastation in japan affect the united states economy? joining me from london is cnn's richard qwest. is this potential shutdown of all the toyota plants in the united states just the first of many effects we're going to suffer from of the disasters over in japan? >> reporter: i think what you're looking at is probably the most widespread part of the effects. the supply chain is being so integrated now into the global economy that it's simply not possible to have a major exporting country like japan suffer such a calamity and there not to be ripple effects in different countries. and let me give you an example if i may. if just take the area where this tsunami and this earthquake took place, it's actually only about 7% to 8% of japanese gdp in its own right. however, one you factor in the way in which japan has closed parts of its domestic industry, transferring resources to deal with this crisis, and then you realize whether it be time and motion just in time, whichever management strategy is now in place in th
evacuating americans from japan as danger levels remain high at the crippled nuclear plan this, despite new attempts by military helicopters to cool off the plant's overheated reactors and fuel rods. the top u.s. nuclear regulator says conditions at the plant are much worse than japanese officials say and recommends that americans say 50 miles away. this morning questions about nearly two dozen nuclear reactors with the very same design "early" this thursday morning, march 17th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning. welcome to "the early show" here on a thursday morning. scenes from earlier. military choppers, japanese military helicopters dropping sea water on this nuclear plant a part of the last-ditch effort to bring sea water in ho help cool down the fuel pools and also the nuclear rods there at this facility. >> that is the effort from the sky. also hearing about water cannons on the ground as they try to bring things in there. we are learning this morning that the pentagon is sending in teams to assess the situation and see in a larger military presence may be needed. also
from the stricken fukushima power plant in the northeast of japan. take a look at these new photos of the plant's four reactors. the buildings surrounding three almost completely destroyed. the other a hole clearly visible spoou spewing smoke into the air. smoke which is most likely containing dangerously high levels of radiation. u.s. embassy officials have just issued a warning to u.s. citizens within 50 miles of the plant to evacuate or stay indoors. clearly, this is a crisis that authorities in japan cannot get ahead of. and today, an extraordinary event in that nation's history. the country's emperor akihito made his first ever televised appearance telling his nation he is "deeply concerned about the crisis." president obama is set to meet with officials from u.s. aid to discuss ashl disaster assistance to japan. the first united states marine humanitarian aid assistance team has arrived on the scene. 20,000 bots of water in hand for the people. but with water levels inside those stricken reactors still too low, there are signs that this crisis is going to continue for some ti
-bye. >>> when we come back, the first confirmed american fatality from japan's tsunami. i'll talk to the young woman's family. [ female announcer ] right now he's not thinking about his future. he can't say social security... much less tell you what it means. he doesn't know that his parents are counting on the money they pay in. or that the hard earned benefits his grandparents receive... are secure. right now he's not thinking about his future. but we are. aarp has been working to preserve social security for more than 50 years. join us in a conversation to strengthen it for years to come. join us in a conversation to strengthen it thbe pt delicious gourmet gravy. and she agrees. wi fcyest gravy lovers, uratannjoy the delicious, satisfying taste grmet gravy every day. fay as the best ingredient is love. but you can still refinance to a fixed rate as low as 4.75% at lendingtree.com, where customers save an average of $293 a month. call lending tree at... today. [ male announcer ] ylord of the carry-on.. sovereign of the security line. you never take an upgrade for granted. and you rent from n
. just ahead, new video of the tsunami in japan unlike any you have seen before. i promise you, it is heart pounding. >>> just when we thought we had seen all the dramatic tsunami video over the past two weeks, we were wrong. this was recently posted on youtube. it is a fishing port of 75,000 people. the tsunami traveled about six miles up the bay before reaching the city. take a look. we will have much, much more on that video coming up next hour on cnn. kes esh kesennuma is close to the fukushima plant in japan. the nuclear facility is now a hot pin cushion. spikes of radiation are pulsing throughout the complex. some readings today were so high that even japan's safety department did not believe they were accurate. an earlier testing showed they were an error. ocean water 1,000 feet from the plant today shows radiation levels more than 1,800 times higher than normal, 1,200 yesterday. wow. >>> here in the united states, flooding, hail, snow and avalanches. big weather headlines to tell you about. jacqui jeras is here. jacqui, as we look at that new video, what did you say? >>
-- the struggle to contain stricken nuclear power plans. a new dawn in japan. new setback for a country desperately trying to regain control. [ man ] ♪ trouble ♪ trouble, trouble trouble, trouble ♪ ♪ trouble been doggin' my soul ♪ since the day i was born ♪ worry ♪ oh, worry, worry worry, worry ♪ [ announcer ] when it comes to things you care about, leave nothing to chance. travelers. take the scary out of life. how are you getting to a happier place? running there? dancing there? how about eating soup to get there? campbell's soups fill you with good nutrition, farm-grown ingredients, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. you think i have allergies? you're sneezing. i'm allergic to you. doubtful, you love me. hey, you can't take allegra with fruit juice. what? yeah, it's on the label. really? here, there's nothing about juice on the zyrtec® label. what? labels are meant to be read. i'd be lost without you. i knew you weren't allergic to me. [ sneezes ] you know, you can't take allegra with orange juice. thank you for joining
at the pentagon. >>> let's go to japan where fears continue to spread, the death toll continues to client. today marks one week after the massive earthquake and the devastating tsunami which battered the country. 6,911 are confirmed dead and another 10,000 are still missing. survivors across japan observed a moment of silence today at the exact time that the quake struck. many still wearing face masks, many of them still in shock. a lot of the survivors are huddling in nearby shelters. japanese media reporting some 380,000 people in shelters. what makes matters worse, some of the shelters with without power and facing freezing temperatures. some survivors are returning home for the first time since the tsunami like this retired firefighter. he lost his home and entire family. >> translator: my wife, my son's family and four grandchildren. i lost them all. >> as for the nuclear crisis, things are not looking much better in fukushima. japan's nuclear agency raised the crisis level on the damaged planted there. you're looking at it, from a four to a five. that raises it to the same level as three m
in japan coming from those damaged nuclear reactors. trace amounts have now been picked up by air monitors in hawaii as well as stations in california, oregon, washington and colorado. authorities say it poses no threat to health. but in the quake zone in japan, the danger from radiation appears to be growing. nbc's chief science correspondent robert bazell reports. >> obviously things are not contained completely at this time. >> reporter: there are serious new concerns about reactor 3 at the fukushima site, which uses highly toxic plutonium in its fuel mixture. japanese officials now say there is a high possibility that the third reactor's fuel rods are damaged and it is leaking radioactive water from the reactor itself or from the pumping system being used to try to cool it. there are also concerns about high levels of radiation at 1 and 2. japan's prime minister called the situation grave and says it does not allow any optimism yet. the problem at reactor 3 was discovered when workers stepped into water that had 10,000 times the amount of radiation typical for a nuclear plant. two of t
'm monita rajpal. >> and i'm zain verjee. ahead a fresh earthquake shakes japan's nuclear plant as work goes on to cool down an overheating reactor. >> change could be on its way in syria after days of deadly protests. the government is expected to lift the state of emergency. >> miami's big three celebrate after a big night. the details in our sports update. >>> first, rebel fighters are advancing on gadhafi's hometown sirte and libyan state tv says it was bombed overnight and suggests government forces are keeping the rebels at a distance from the city for now. that despite an early report in which a source claimed anti-government fighters took sirte. rebels appear to capture key towns from loyalists. ras lanuf and elal brega seems be in their hands. here is the scene last night in the capital tripoli. our correspondent there says he heard six explosions followed by bursts of anti-aircraft fire. >> international forces continue to strike libyan targets over the weekend and nato says it is taking over full control of allied operations. it's now going to oversee the no-fly zone, an arms emba
for alarm, tiny radioactive particles from japan are detected today in california. a reminder, this is a global challenge that could drag on for weeks or more. we'll dig deep on the six-reactor emergency in just a moment with the help of this startling new satellite imagery. look here at the destruction in this nuclear complex, especially in the buildings where highly radioactive spent fuel is stored and where we now know sadly there are major problems. but first, the likelihood of military action against libya and involving u.s. forcesize dramatically higher tonight. earlier today libya's government responded to a tough new united nations resolution authorizing military strikes and said it would agree to a cease-fire in its struggle against opposition forces. but within hours there was ample evidence, including i'm told u.s. intelligence images, that the fighting continues. tonight the white house says gadhafi is in violation of that resolution already and the libyan dictator is left to mull this stern warning from the president of the united states. >> if gadhafi does not co
much. >>> this is "world one" live from london. the search for loved ones continues in japan. >> translator: no matter what's happened to him, i just want him back, my child should come home to me. i need to find him. >> we meet a mother who lost everything but still managed to find hope. ♪ ♪ one, two, three, four ♪ you say ♪ flip it over and replay ♪ we'll make everything okay ♪ walk together the right way ♪ do, do, do, do [ male announcer ] ylord of the carry-on.. sovereign of the security line. you never take an upgrade for granted. and you rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i deserve this. [ male announcer ] you do, business pro. you do. go national. go like a pro. ♪ [ male announcer ] what are you gonna miss when you have an allergy attack? benadryl® is more effective than claritin® at relieving your worst symptoms and works when you need it most. benadryl®. you can't pause life. >>> welcome back. we want to get you a quick upd
news. 3 in japan... health officials are urging tokyy esidents noo to hoard bottlee water.this after radiation levels in the tap water tested high for infants and pregnant women. storesswere ransacked by people stocking up on bottled water and groceries. instead of an alarm clock...a mississippi woman is suddenly awakened by a naked man... falling through her ceiling. kaly townsend was napping when her neighbor fell though... in his birttddy suit. police say williams went though a duct in the apartment avoid being arresttd on drug o charges... unfortunately for him ... the ceiling gave way. "and then,, e gets halfway out the door and runs back in screaming at me just to borrow a pair of shorts, so, finally, i get him to leave and he grabs my jacket and steals it, wraps it around him and runs put the door." police arrested williams and returned townsend's jacket. rescuers had to save a woman trapped on a 450-foot cliff... and she was naked.it happened near a beach in san diego. crews had to use harnesses and why she was up there... - how she got there... and why she was naked ...
right now on libya. also an apology in japan. after more workers are exposed to potentially deadly levels of radiation. and what's being blamed for this overexposure? a communications error. all this while fears grow that one reactor at that plant could be leaking. from the cnn center in atlanta, georgia, this is your cnn start morning. hello to you all. glad you could spent some part of your saturday morning with us. i'm t.j. holmes. i do want to start now, though, in japan with the growing concern over radiation levels in the ocean water around that damaged nuclear plant. radiation levels in the air at least seem to be decreasing. paula hancock's live for us in tokyo. hello to up. what are they saying about this possible leak of one of those reaccour reactor cores. that's a key concern right now. >> reporter: absolutely. well, t.j., this was said friday evening local time when they were concerned there could have been a break or rupture within the reactor core as well and this is why the water was 10,000 times the radioactive level than it should have been. but now they're saying
. born in the usa. >> shepard: rescue teams in japan do not expect to ever find the 13,000 people who are officially missing since this month's elk and tsunami there the national police agency reports more than thousand people already confirmed dead. the military now burying victims in mass graves. and more than a quarter million people are said to still be living in shelters. and the danger has not passed. three large aftershocks measuring higher than 6.0 struck today off japan's east coast. that's the same region where the monster 9.0 hit on the 11th of march. and to put it all in perspective. here is a map that will show all of the earthquakes that have hit japan in just the last week. each of the yellow and orange dots represents one quake. more on this and the ongoing nuclear crisis and a live from japan coming up directly. but, first, back to libya and a qaddafi's cash. the money he uses to pay his forces and those foreign mercenaries to attack his own people. the united nations has now frozen assets he has in other countries. but u.s. officials say he still has a huge stockpile
food coming from japan. that story coming up next hour. >> thanks, guy. >>> also ahead in the next hour, great deals on good stuff. millions looking for coupons on groupons. how they acty work. pancakes! ♪ from dawnl suns, i'll never walk away ♪ ♪ blueberry pancakes are so good ♪ [ male annoceancake love. professional driver on a closed course. ♪ do not attempt at home. always wear your seat belt. ♪ and please drive responsibl [ male announcer ] it's the most fun you can gay ha. see your authorized mercedes-benz deal for exceptional offers on the c-class. >>> oh, big excitement in the basketball world. i guess the defending champions arout? >> oh, duke is done. >> oh. >> just when you thought they might be making a run for a repeat championship, the number one seeded blue devils, la year's champs, they lost. in fact, they were dominated in the sweet 16 against arizona. boy, the wildcats took it to them in afacets of the game. derek williams unstoppable. a great merican having game and teammates stepped up. 55 points in the second half. duke loses 93-77. the blue devils will
markets are sending this message. maybe the worst is over in japan, and maybe all the action in libya will not further disrupt the flow of oil. that's why in the last three days, the dow industrial average has gone up 423 points. that's about 3 1/2%. and that's why as of right now the dow jones industrial average is higher than it was on march tenth, the day before the japanese earthquake. and by the way martha, in all likelihood, 20 minutes from now, the dow jones industrial average will open higher still. it's a head scratcher, but it's going to happen. martha: it's fascinating. i guess in this sideways, stuart, you hope that the market, as it often is, is an indicator of things to come. and that stability may be accurately placed, you know. we can only hope at this point. but also merger activity giving a bit of a boost as well, right? >> that helped the market yesterday, that's for sure. at&t wants to buy t-mobile, big merger in the data transmission networking business. that gave the market is boost. but you've got to say, martha, the dow, at 12,000, despite the middle east fight
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